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Blog

Filtering by Tag: process

Passport Series: Brazil

Paul Haworth

If Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee, Brazil is where it went to business school. Really though, coffee as a globally traded commodity has been more impacted by Brazil then any other country of origin. The saying goes that when Brazil sneezes, the rest of the coffee world catches a cold. Anyone who wants to understand how coffee prices have been (and still are being) set, learn why Fair Trade was established, or glimpse the full potential of highly mechanized coffee production cannot do so without learning about Brazil.

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Passport Series: Ethiopia

Paul Haworth

Specialty coffee can be grown in many parts of the world. The main requirements are a tropical climate and proper altitude. The differences found in coffee producing regions of the world are exciting and easy to decipher when you know a few basic conditions that contribute. We will be spending some time exploring these conditions as we go region by region. We will start in Ethiopia since it's considered the 'birthplace of coffee.'

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Why Do Roasters Go To Origin?

Paul Haworth

It may seem like a silly question, but let's really think about this. Obviously, there is more than one reason for a coffee roaster or buyer to travel to where their product is actually grown. There are three main categories of motives we can discuss. First is the qualitative element; a buyer will be able to taste many coffees and earmark the handful that fit his or her requirements. Second, we have the marketing aspect. Being able to say that you met a farmer and bought their coffee is very impressive. Finally, there is the rejuvenation of passion that can only be attained in an environment of origin.

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Less Coffee, More Experience

Paul Haworth

Coffee professionals are often asked how many cups they consume in a given day. If you aren't one of them (and haven't ever asked the question) the answer may surprise you. Does a single cup per day seem crazy? It is actually pretty common for this to be the case. Some prefer as few as 5 ounces while others may consume as many as 12, but rarely do you find a specialty coffee pro who is drinking cup after cup as one might imagine. Why is this?

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Tis the Season: A look at Coffee Seasonality

Paul Haworth

This time of year, we are all very aware of seasons. Coffee also has its seasons. For the beans to be created, coffee trees must first develop beautiful and aromatic flowers. These flowers will give way to cherries which will eventually be carefully selected. These cherries will be processed to yield their seeds. These seeds will then be roasted and consumed as 'coffee beans.'

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The Way of Coffee

Paul Haworth

Something fantastic in Japanese culture is how philosophy and craft are so interrelated, it can be difficult to see where one ends and the other begins. This integration gives Japanese craft a sense of timeless heritage and transcendent value. They have a word encompassing this marriage between heart and hand which is loosely translated into the English word 'way.' It is obvious from our weak translation that we do not really have the same concept here, but perhaps we should.

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What's the Big Deal about Coffee Processing?

Paul Haworth

Many specialty products are organized into categories that make them more approachable. In the world of wine, knowing the answer to the question, "red or white," can help a customer feel empowered and confident enough to explore further 'subcategories' within their purchasing decision. Historically in coffee, this categorical empowerment has been associated more with roast style than the actual qualities of the bean. Now that we are becoming more aware of details that determine bean character (and putting roast style aside), what should be our basic categorization for specialty coffee?

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